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The Economist UK Edition

Mar 06 2021
Magazine

The Economist is the premier source for the analysis of world business and current affairs, providing authoritative insight and opinion on international news, world politics, business, finance, science and technology, as well as overviews of cultural trends and regular Special reports on industries and countries.

Coronavirus briefs • To 6am GMT March 4th 2021

The world this week

Bouncing back • How to make a social safety net for the post-covid world

St Augustine’s economics • The chancellor wants to rein in government spending, but not yet

It’s complicated • What America should do in the Middle East

The darkest corners • A clear-out of the security agencies shows the opacity of power in China

The lessons of Fukushima • Nuclear power must be well run, not ditched

Letters

Shelter from the storm • The pandemic has transformed the welfare state. Which changes will endure?

A game of two halves • The chancellor has announced a big giveaway now, and hefty tax rises later

A funny smell in Holyrood • The first minister is on the rack, but likely to survive

Nazi parties • A long-dead politician raises eyebrows from beyond the grave

Grand designs • Carrie Symonds may struggle to spruce up the prime ministerial quarters

Stopping the rot • Why the future of Britain rests on reviving the Scottish Labour Party

Swindled? • High fees and living away from home are a bad combination in a pandemic

The Tees party • DARLINGTON

The art of the steal • The Tories are world-beaters when it comes to nicking ideas

New kings of the wild frontier • Frontex, the EU’S border force, swells in size and runs into trouble

An end to impunity • Nicolas Sarkozy appeals a jail sentence for corruption

An emperor’s clothes • PARIS

After the war • YEREVAN

Prisoner of confusion • How the Kremlin outwitted Amnesty International

A Swabian success story • How Germany’s Greens conquered the country’s industrial heartland

Exodus, chapter 41 • NEW YORK

Slimming tips • WASHINGTON, DC

Red and black • Radicals once had a special bond with China. Now only echoes of it remain

If I had a hammer • LOS ANGELES

Swimming freestyle • WASHINGTON, DC

Two nations under God • NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE AND KELLER, TEXAS

The millennial caudillo • SAN SALVADOR

A sea change • SANTIAGO

A gap between Chile and the rest • Vaccination is woefully politicised in most of Latin America

Still bearing the cross • QARAQOSH

A jab among friends • DUBAI

Out and preyed on • The young are barely more tolerant than the old

Tomato truce • ABUJA

The shooting starts • SINGAPORE

Pig mistake • A ham-fisted decree is trampled by market forces

Web of regulation • DELHI

Nuclear decay • IITATE, OKUMA AND TOKYO

Asia’s unjabbed arms • Places that were quick to curb covid-19 have been slow to vaccinate

Scraping the bones • China’s law-enforcement agencies are undergoing their biggest purge in more than two decades. The aim is to root out the corrupt and politically disloyal

The law kicks in • HONG KONG

Red tourism in Xi’s China • A formerly disgraced place of Maoist pilgrimage plots a comeback

Here we go again • LUSAKA

Racing ahead • One firm. One year. One billion shots or more. Can India’s Serum Institute do it?

DAX vaxxers • BERLIN

A shot in the dark • How far should firms go to get their staff vaccinated?

Expansion, your honour! • HONG KONG

Let...


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English

The Economist is the premier source for the analysis of world business and current affairs, providing authoritative insight and opinion on international news, world politics, business, finance, science and technology, as well as overviews of cultural trends and regular Special reports on industries and countries.

Coronavirus briefs • To 6am GMT March 4th 2021

The world this week

Bouncing back • How to make a social safety net for the post-covid world

St Augustine’s economics • The chancellor wants to rein in government spending, but not yet

It’s complicated • What America should do in the Middle East

The darkest corners • A clear-out of the security agencies shows the opacity of power in China

The lessons of Fukushima • Nuclear power must be well run, not ditched

Letters

Shelter from the storm • The pandemic has transformed the welfare state. Which changes will endure?

A game of two halves • The chancellor has announced a big giveaway now, and hefty tax rises later

A funny smell in Holyrood • The first minister is on the rack, but likely to survive

Nazi parties • A long-dead politician raises eyebrows from beyond the grave

Grand designs • Carrie Symonds may struggle to spruce up the prime ministerial quarters

Stopping the rot • Why the future of Britain rests on reviving the Scottish Labour Party

Swindled? • High fees and living away from home are a bad combination in a pandemic

The Tees party • DARLINGTON

The art of the steal • The Tories are world-beaters when it comes to nicking ideas

New kings of the wild frontier • Frontex, the EU’S border force, swells in size and runs into trouble

An end to impunity • Nicolas Sarkozy appeals a jail sentence for corruption

An emperor’s clothes • PARIS

After the war • YEREVAN

Prisoner of confusion • How the Kremlin outwitted Amnesty International

A Swabian success story • How Germany’s Greens conquered the country’s industrial heartland

Exodus, chapter 41 • NEW YORK

Slimming tips • WASHINGTON, DC

Red and black • Radicals once had a special bond with China. Now only echoes of it remain

If I had a hammer • LOS ANGELES

Swimming freestyle • WASHINGTON, DC

Two nations under God • NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE AND KELLER, TEXAS

The millennial caudillo • SAN SALVADOR

A sea change • SANTIAGO

A gap between Chile and the rest • Vaccination is woefully politicised in most of Latin America

Still bearing the cross • QARAQOSH

A jab among friends • DUBAI

Out and preyed on • The young are barely more tolerant than the old

Tomato truce • ABUJA

The shooting starts • SINGAPORE

Pig mistake • A ham-fisted decree is trampled by market forces

Web of regulation • DELHI

Nuclear decay • IITATE, OKUMA AND TOKYO

Asia’s unjabbed arms • Places that were quick to curb covid-19 have been slow to vaccinate

Scraping the bones • China’s law-enforcement agencies are undergoing their biggest purge in more than two decades. The aim is to root out the corrupt and politically disloyal

The law kicks in • HONG KONG

Red tourism in Xi’s China • A formerly disgraced place of Maoist pilgrimage plots a comeback

Here we go again • LUSAKA

Racing ahead • One firm. One year. One billion shots or more. Can India’s Serum Institute do it?

DAX vaxxers • BERLIN

A shot in the dark • How far should firms go to get their staff vaccinated?

Expansion, your honour! • HONG KONG

Let...


Expand title description text