Error loading page.
Try refreshing the page. If that doesn't work, there may be a network issue, and you can use our self test page to see what's preventing the page from loading.
Learn more about possible network issues or contact support for more help.

The Economist UK Edition

Jul 17 2021
Magazine

The Economist is the premier source for the analysis of world business and current affairs, providing authoritative insight and opinion on international news, world politics, business, finance, science and technology, as well as overviews of cultural trends and regular Special reports on industries and countries.

Coronavirus briefs • To 6am GMT Jul 15th 2021

The world this week

Biden’s new China doctrine • Its protectionism and its us-or-them rhetoric will hurt America and put off allies

Rule of lawlessness • The worst unrest since apartheid underlines South Africa’s fragility

The mask slips • The best way to help Cuba’s protesters is to lift the American embargo

Carbon and capture • In principle carbon border taxes are a good idea. In practice they could be a gift to protectionists

A cloud of suspicion • As athletes arrive in Tokyo for the Olympics, doping is still common. The system needs reform

Letters

Pushing back • WASHINGTON, DC

Blot on the landscape • MELKSHAM, WILTSHIRE

Eco-warriors • Opponents of housebuilding claim to care more about the environment than about house prices

The final cut • Lower spending is only one sign of Britain’s reduced ambitions

Pain now, gain later • Cutting net carbon emissions to zero will be eye-wateringly expensive

Closure denied • BELFAST

Driving: a hard bargain • BIRMINGHAM

Red in tooth and claw • LIVERPOOL

Auf Wiedersehen, Amerika! • BERLIN

An anti-corruption party triumphs • Moldova has a chance to clean up. Bulgaria, not so much

The grapes are off • Climate change is affecting the flavour of Europe’s wines

Electric island • ATHENS

A less than jolly green giant • The EU is better placed than national governments to set green standards. This will be painful

Joe Biden’s mystery train • WASHINGTON, DC

Texodus • HOUSTON

Pastime • DENVER

Blowing the inheritance • WASHINGTON, DC

Anti-trust in me • WASHINGTON, DC

The anti-vax delusion • America’s vaccination programme is stalling. Populist conservatives are to blame

A revolt against the revolution • The communist island has not seen such big displays of discontent for decades

Après Moïse, le déluge? • No one knows who killed Haiti’s president or what to do about it

A Mexican show trial? • A battle against corruption with more theatre than substance

Jacob’s looters • JOHANNESBURG

Unlikely bedfellows • KHARTOUM

The most dangerous place in the Horn • AL-FASHAGA

Courting trouble • A trial in Jordan has exposed the fissures in King Abdullah’s rule

The enemy of my friend • JERUSALEM

Rings on the ropes • TOKYO

No fun and games • TOKYO

Rajapaksa raj • Sri Lanka’s ruling dynasty is not as secure as it appears

The next covid catastrophe • SINGAPORE

The small print • BEIJING AND SHANGHAI

Patriotism and prejudice • Rising nationalism is making life harder again for gay people in China

Turning inward • Covid-19 fears are combining with rising nationalism to keep China closed

The eagle and the rabbit • The destination is the same but the race back to the Moon today differs in important ways from the first

Inconspicuous expansion • HONG KONG

The finite frontier • NEW YORK

White shoes are made for earnin’ • NEW YORK

Work in progress • PARIS

Different pitches • The pros and cons of differing management styles

Superpower surge • China’s “dreamchild” is stealthily winning the...


Expand title description text

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

Languages

English

The Economist is the premier source for the analysis of world business and current affairs, providing authoritative insight and opinion on international news, world politics, business, finance, science and technology, as well as overviews of cultural trends and regular Special reports on industries and countries.

Coronavirus briefs • To 6am GMT Jul 15th 2021

The world this week

Biden’s new China doctrine • Its protectionism and its us-or-them rhetoric will hurt America and put off allies

Rule of lawlessness • The worst unrest since apartheid underlines South Africa’s fragility

The mask slips • The best way to help Cuba’s protesters is to lift the American embargo

Carbon and capture • In principle carbon border taxes are a good idea. In practice they could be a gift to protectionists

A cloud of suspicion • As athletes arrive in Tokyo for the Olympics, doping is still common. The system needs reform

Letters

Pushing back • WASHINGTON, DC

Blot on the landscape • MELKSHAM, WILTSHIRE

Eco-warriors • Opponents of housebuilding claim to care more about the environment than about house prices

The final cut • Lower spending is only one sign of Britain’s reduced ambitions

Pain now, gain later • Cutting net carbon emissions to zero will be eye-wateringly expensive

Closure denied • BELFAST

Driving: a hard bargain • BIRMINGHAM

Red in tooth and claw • LIVERPOOL

Auf Wiedersehen, Amerika! • BERLIN

An anti-corruption party triumphs • Moldova has a chance to clean up. Bulgaria, not so much

The grapes are off • Climate change is affecting the flavour of Europe’s wines

Electric island • ATHENS

A less than jolly green giant • The EU is better placed than national governments to set green standards. This will be painful

Joe Biden’s mystery train • WASHINGTON, DC

Texodus • HOUSTON

Pastime • DENVER

Blowing the inheritance • WASHINGTON, DC

Anti-trust in me • WASHINGTON, DC

The anti-vax delusion • America’s vaccination programme is stalling. Populist conservatives are to blame

A revolt against the revolution • The communist island has not seen such big displays of discontent for decades

Après Moïse, le déluge? • No one knows who killed Haiti’s president or what to do about it

A Mexican show trial? • A battle against corruption with more theatre than substance

Jacob’s looters • JOHANNESBURG

Unlikely bedfellows • KHARTOUM

The most dangerous place in the Horn • AL-FASHAGA

Courting trouble • A trial in Jordan has exposed the fissures in King Abdullah’s rule

The enemy of my friend • JERUSALEM

Rings on the ropes • TOKYO

No fun and games • TOKYO

Rajapaksa raj • Sri Lanka’s ruling dynasty is not as secure as it appears

The next covid catastrophe • SINGAPORE

The small print • BEIJING AND SHANGHAI

Patriotism and prejudice • Rising nationalism is making life harder again for gay people in China

Turning inward • Covid-19 fears are combining with rising nationalism to keep China closed

The eagle and the rabbit • The destination is the same but the race back to the Moon today differs in important ways from the first

Inconspicuous expansion • HONG KONG

The finite frontier • NEW YORK

White shoes are made for earnin’ • NEW YORK

Work in progress • PARIS

Different pitches • The pros and cons of differing management styles

Superpower surge • China’s “dreamchild” is stealthily winning the...


Expand title description text