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The Economist UK Edition

Aug 28 2021
Magazine

The Economist is the premier source for the analysis of world business and current affairs, providing authoritative insight and opinion on international news, world politics, business, finance, science and technology, as well as overviews of cultural trends and regular Special reports on industries and countries.

Coronavirus briefs • To 6am GMT Aug 26th 2021

The world this week

Where next for global jihad? • Other Islamist insurgents are inspired by the Taliban’s triumph. The biggest danger will be in poor, unstable states

A rock in a hard place • The mess in Afghanistan has shown up the shallowness of Britain’s security policy

The Powell punt • Despite his shortcomings, Jerome Powell should be reappointed as Fed chairman

The future of Cappletalism • Apple has been the beneficiary of a freewheeling economic era that is drawing to a close. Watch how it adapts

To see a world in a grain of sand • Fundamental physics is one of humanity’s most extraordinary achievements

Letters

The future of American power

A new model for the armies • DAKAR, ISLAMABAD AND PARIS

Yet another squabble • By weakening transatlantic ties, the Afghanistan debacle has strengthened the case for Britain to work more closely with the European Union

No sex please, we’re skittish • Under pressure from banks, a porn platform wobbles on X-rated content

Pheasants revolt • Britain has lots of pheasants—to the distress of some

Bosses beware • A new general secretary at Unite plots a radical overhaul

Not even past • Gangs are more common in areas of London that were heavily bombed

Build it and they will rent • Big British companies are seeking to become landlords

Light at the end of the tunnel • WHITECHAPEL

His master’s voice • What Tony taught Boris

What a time to be Olaf • BERLIN

A visit to an AfD stronghold • PIRNA

Hoping for their time • PARIS

Not yet out of the woods • Employment is growing strongly, but the recovery still has some way to go

Bigots anonymous • MOSCOW

Nowhere fast • The polite fiction that Turkey is a candidate for eu membership is unravelling

Fogged in • SAN FRANCISCO

The left-behind • WASHINGTON, DC

In the shadows • NEW YORK

Off to the races • WASHINGTON, DC

Signs of vitalism • WASHINGTON, DC

Total recall • Gavin Newsom, one of the Democrats’ great white hopes, is on the ropes

Joe Biden’s other headache • Democracy is being eroded in El Salvador, Honduras, Guatemala and Nicaragua

A palaeontological paradox • SUCRE AND TOROTORO

A bad lot • MEXICO CITY

Not above the law • NAIROBI

Death of a dictator • DAKAR

Willing hosts • KAMPALA

Retirement home for exiles • Why Afghan officials (and their money) have washed up in the Gulf

Extra-virgin territory • BAASIR

The final countdown • ISLAMABAD

Nation-gilding • America repeats a mistake from its war in Vietnam

More young people are flying the nest • SINGAPORE

Covid how much? • Australia is moving away from its zero-covid strategy

The beeping pandemic • Thai motorists try to honk down a government

Fearing the wurst • BEIJING

One more thought • HONG KONG

Why China gets so angry • Nationalist outrage has often served China well, but that may be changing

Farming’s new frontiers • Climate change will alter where many crops are grown. That means gains for some people, but losses for more

The great successor’s second act • CUPERTINO

Gone today, here...


Expand title description text

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

Languages

English

The Economist is the premier source for the analysis of world business and current affairs, providing authoritative insight and opinion on international news, world politics, business, finance, science and technology, as well as overviews of cultural trends and regular Special reports on industries and countries.

Coronavirus briefs • To 6am GMT Aug 26th 2021

The world this week

Where next for global jihad? • Other Islamist insurgents are inspired by the Taliban’s triumph. The biggest danger will be in poor, unstable states

A rock in a hard place • The mess in Afghanistan has shown up the shallowness of Britain’s security policy

The Powell punt • Despite his shortcomings, Jerome Powell should be reappointed as Fed chairman

The future of Cappletalism • Apple has been the beneficiary of a freewheeling economic era that is drawing to a close. Watch how it adapts

To see a world in a grain of sand • Fundamental physics is one of humanity’s most extraordinary achievements

Letters

The future of American power

A new model for the armies • DAKAR, ISLAMABAD AND PARIS

Yet another squabble • By weakening transatlantic ties, the Afghanistan debacle has strengthened the case for Britain to work more closely with the European Union

No sex please, we’re skittish • Under pressure from banks, a porn platform wobbles on X-rated content

Pheasants revolt • Britain has lots of pheasants—to the distress of some

Bosses beware • A new general secretary at Unite plots a radical overhaul

Not even past • Gangs are more common in areas of London that were heavily bombed

Build it and they will rent • Big British companies are seeking to become landlords

Light at the end of the tunnel • WHITECHAPEL

His master’s voice • What Tony taught Boris

What a time to be Olaf • BERLIN

A visit to an AfD stronghold • PIRNA

Hoping for their time • PARIS

Not yet out of the woods • Employment is growing strongly, but the recovery still has some way to go

Bigots anonymous • MOSCOW

Nowhere fast • The polite fiction that Turkey is a candidate for eu membership is unravelling

Fogged in • SAN FRANCISCO

The left-behind • WASHINGTON, DC

In the shadows • NEW YORK

Off to the races • WASHINGTON, DC

Signs of vitalism • WASHINGTON, DC

Total recall • Gavin Newsom, one of the Democrats’ great white hopes, is on the ropes

Joe Biden’s other headache • Democracy is being eroded in El Salvador, Honduras, Guatemala and Nicaragua

A palaeontological paradox • SUCRE AND TOROTORO

A bad lot • MEXICO CITY

Not above the law • NAIROBI

Death of a dictator • DAKAR

Willing hosts • KAMPALA

Retirement home for exiles • Why Afghan officials (and their money) have washed up in the Gulf

Extra-virgin territory • BAASIR

The final countdown • ISLAMABAD

Nation-gilding • America repeats a mistake from its war in Vietnam

More young people are flying the nest • SINGAPORE

Covid how much? • Australia is moving away from its zero-covid strategy

The beeping pandemic • Thai motorists try to honk down a government

Fearing the wurst • BEIJING

One more thought • HONG KONG

Why China gets so angry • Nationalist outrage has often served China well, but that may be changing

Farming’s new frontiers • Climate change will alter where many crops are grown. That means gains for some people, but losses for more

The great successor’s second act • CUPERTINO

Gone today, here...


Expand title description text